Government (GOV) & International Affairs (INTL)

The Department of Government & International Affairs offers each student a foundational understanding of government and politics at all levels, and preparation for leadership in the community, nation and world.  The department builds on Wofford's broad liberal education by challenging students to deliberate on a diversity of ideas of justice, experiences of politics, and structures of power. Graduates can creatively confront the latest problem or debate, while rooted in a deep appreciation of our cultural, intellectual and political heritage.  

Majors are offered in Government or International Affairs.  Students majoring in Government can also select optional concentrations in American Politics and Political Theory.  The International Affairs major offers an optional global linking experience.  Minors are also offered in Government or International Affairs.

Honors Courses and In-Course Honors

The Department of Government encourages its students to undertake honors work. For further information, the student is referred to the sections on Honors Courses and In-Course Honors in the Catalog.

Chair

William E. DeMars

Professors

J. David Alvis
John Farrenkopf
Robert C. Jeffrey
Rachel J. Vanderhill

For both the Government and International Affairs majors, GOV 202 Foundations of American Politics and INTL 203 Foundations of World Politics should be completed, each with a grade of 'C' or better, before a student declares the major.

Students majoring in Government who are seeking to earn secondary education licensure to teach social studies should refer to the Teacher Education Handbook and consult with the chairs of the departments of Government & International Affairs and Education to plan for the required related work in the areas of History, Geography, Economics and Sociology.

Requirements for the Major in Government

The Government major offers a broad range of courses in American Politics, Political Theory and International Affairs, with considerable freedom to select courses and tailor an individual program.  Students may pursue the major alone, or one of two optional five-course concentrations within the major: the Concentration in American Politics or the Concentration in Political Theory.  

Foundations6
Foundations of American Politics
Foundations of World Politics
America in the World3
Select one course from the following:
Comparing States & Societies
American Foreign Policy
America & the Global Economy
American Politics6
Select two courses from the following:
American Political Development I
American Political Development II
Leadership & Globalization in South Carolina
South Carolina Politics
The American Presidency
Southern Politics
African American Politics
Public Administration
Health Care Policy & Administration
Constitutional Law of the United States
American Political Thought
Advanced Topics in American Government
Political Theory6
Select two courses from the following:
Classical Political Thought
Modern Political Thought
Statesmanship of Lincoln
Contemporary Political Thought
Statesmanship of Winston Churchill
Politics and Literature
American Political Thought
Advanced Topics in Political Theory
Electives9
Select 9 credit hours from GOV or INTL
Total Hours30

Requirements for the Major in Government with a Concentration in American Politics

The Government major with a Concentration in American Politics offers students a broad understanding of the development of ideas, institutions and leadership in the American political system, as well as the policy debates that have shaped our political life.  With this knowledge, students will be prepared to analyze contemporary policy and constitutional controversies, to pursue advanced degrees or careers in policy, politics, law, and public service, and to be engaged and active citizens.  Students are encouraged to intern in government offices or non-profit organizations, or to volunteer in political campaigns.

Foundations6
Foundations of American Politics
Foundations of World Politics
America in the World3
Select one course from the following:
Comparing States & Societies
American Foreign Policy
America & the Global Economy
American Politics Core6
American Political Development I
American Political Development II
Federal Government Institutions3
Select one course from the following:
The American Presidency
Public Administration
Constitutional Law of the United States
American Political Theory3
Select one course from the following:
Modern Political Thought
Statesmanship of Lincoln
American Political Thought
Policy and Regional Politics3
Select one course from the following:
Leadership & Globalization in South Carolina
South Carolina Politics
Southern Politics
African American Politics
Health Care Policy & Administration
US Environmental Policy
Electives6
Select 6 credit hours from GOV or INTL
Total Hours30

Requirements for the Major in Government with a Concentration in Political Theory

In the Government major with a Concentration in Political Theory, students will read and master the fundamental works of the western political tradition—works that were formative in the education of the American founders.  Students will also study statesmanship, in which leaders are challenged to preserve democracy in periods of extreme crisis, will learn how poetry and literature can convey political wisdom, and will explore contemporary debates in political theory.  This concentration is excellent preparation for public life, for graduate study in law, political science or other fields, and for well-lived private lives. 

Foundations6
Foundations of American Politics
Foundations of World Politics
America in the World3
Select one course from the following:
Comparing States & Societies
American Foreign Policy
America & the Global Economy
Political Theory Core6
Classical Political Thought
Modern Political Thought
Political Theory Electives9
Select three courses from the following:
Statesmanship of Lincoln
Contemporary Political Thought
Statesmanship of Winston Churchill
Politics and Literature
American Political Thought
Advanced Topics in Political Theory
Electives6
Select 6 credit hours from GOV or INTL
Total Hours30

Requirements for the Major in International Affairs

The Major in International Affairs offers students the opportunity to combine essential global learning with personalized, real-world experience.  Students will take in-depth courses in global civil society, national security, foreign policy, at least one world region, and America in the world.  If they also pursue another Wofford credential that reflects their aspirations for global engagement, they will then have the option to tie together the International Affairs Major and this paired program with a Global Linking Experience such as a semester abroad or a relevant internship.  

Combined with recommended travel and language opportunities, the International Affairs Major and optional Global Linking Experience can provide students with powerful preparation for a life and career of constructive interaction with a rapidly changing world. 

Foundations6
Foundations of American Politics
Foundations of World Politics
America in the World6
Select two course from the following:
Comparing States & Societies
American Foreign Policy
America & the Global Economy
Regional Politics3
Select one course from the following:
European Politics
Middle East Politics
China: Politics, Economy and Foreign Relations
African Politics
Russia & Its Neighbors
National Security and Grand Strategy3
Select one course from the following:
The Bomb: Nuclear Weapons Past, Present and Future
Revolutions & Regime Change
International Conflict
Statesmanship of Winston Churchill
Global Governance and Civil Society3
Select one course from the following:
Global Issues
Empire
NGOs in World Politics
Politics of the United Nations
Leadership & Globalization in South Carolina
Electives6
Select 6 credit hours from GOV or INTL
Senior Seminar3
Advanced Topics in International Affairs and Comparative Government
Total Hours30

The Department of Government & International Affairs strongly recommends that each student majoring in International Affairs completes the following in addition to the major requirements:

  1. Study abroad for a semester or summer abroad, or a travel Interim; and
  2. Study a modern language through the 202-level, or test at the Intermediate Low proficiency level on the ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview.

Optional Global Linking Experience

Today, every field and institution of human endeavor is increasingly influenced by global forces.  Therefore, a student of International Affairs is well-advised to gain another field of specialization.  Many of Wofford’s minors and programs, or an additional major, are well suited to be such a paired program.  The Global Linking Experience is an option available for students to tie together their International Affairs Major with a paired program through experience, reflection and documentation.  

The optional Global Linking Experience asks each major in International Affairs who chooses to pursue it to:

  1. EXPERIENCE: undertake either a semester abroad or a relevant internship that is related to both International Affairs and to the selected paired program.  In exceptional circumstances, the International Affairs Coordinator may approve alternative projects as fulfilling this requirement; 
  2. DOCUMENT: document in written or other media the experience itself, and the links it reveals between International Affairs and the paired program, as part of the Senior Seminar.  This documentation may also be useful for job or graduate school applications.;

The plan for an optional paired program and Global Linking Experience should be reported to, and approved by, the International Affairs Major Coordinator by the end of a student’s junior year.  Each student’s Global Linking Experience will be evaluated and documented as part of their Senior Seminar.  Students who choose not to do the Global Linking Experience will complete a different assignment in the Senior Seminar.

Requirements for the Minor in Government

GOV 202Foundations of American Politics3
Select an additional 15 credit hours of Government (GOV) courses 115
Total Hours18

Requirements for the Minor in International Affairs

INTL 203Foundations of World Politics3
Select an additional 15 credit hours of International Affairs (INTL) courses 215
Total Hours18
1

One INTL course may be applied to the Government minor.  With the exception of GOV 202, courses taken in fulfillment of the Government minor may NOT also be applied to the International Affairs major or minor.

2

One GOV course may be applied to the International Affairs minor.  With the exception of INTL 203, courses taken in fulfillment of the International Affairs minor may NOT also be applied to the Government major or minor.

Government (GOV)

GOV 202. Foundations of American Politics. 3 Hours.

An introduction to American national government emphasizing constitutional principles and the historical development of institutions and processes.


GOV 280. Selected Topics in Government. 1 to 4 Hours.

Selected topics in Government at the introductory or intermediate level.


GOV 310. American Political Development I. 3 Hours.

This is the first in a two course series in American Political Development, a subfield of Political Science dedicated to analyzing and explaining key transformative changes in the American political system including citizenship, political institutions, and political parties and movements. American Political Development I examines this evolution from the Founding to the Era of Reconstruction.


GOV 311. American Political Development II. 3 Hours.

This is the second in a two course series in American Political Development, a subfield of Political Science dedicated to analyzing and explaining key transformative changes in the American political system including citizenship, political institutions, and political parties and movements. American Political Development II examines this evolution from the Progressive Era (early 1900s) to today.


GOV 320. Leadership & Globalization in South Carolina. 3 Hours.

Students will learn how South Carolina is shaped by its global connections of culture, work and politics, and how leaders in all these fields attempt to shape those forces and with what results. Students will integrate a wide range of encounters with leaders, experiences, readings, teachings, films and student projects.


GOV 330. South Carolina Politics. 3 Hours.

This course will explore the political structure, political history and culture, and current issues in South Carolina.


GOV 331. The American Presidency. 3 Hours.

An examination of the sources of and constraints on Presidential authority, of the roles of the President in the United States and the world, and of the organization of the office and its advisory institutions and its relations with Congress and the Judiciary.


GOV 333. Southern Politics. 3 Hours.

This course examines the political culture, historical background, and current trends in the politics of the American South. The course consists of reading, discussion, lectures, and presentations by members of the seminar.


GOV 335. African American Politics. 3 Hours.

American political life is defined by two fundamental commitments: democracy and the protection of individual rights. The most notable conflicts in our nation's history have been those where the desires of a majority impede the rights of a minority. This course examines the struggle of African Americans for equal rights by studying both the political and civil rights movements, and also the legal battles for racial equality in the courts.


GOV 340. Public Administration. 3 Hours.

This course provides a working knowledge of the history, theories and practice of public administration in the United States at the national, state and local levels, and an introduction to careers in public management.


GOV 345. Health Care Policy & Administration. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the U.S. health care system, its internal administration, and the evolution of federal and state policy. We focus on the political dynamics of public health care, and particularly on administration and policy formulation as it affects private insurers, Medicare and Medicaid, and changes wrought by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The course draws on lectures by experts in the public health sector and examines the growing body of administrative and public policy literature in this area. No disciplinary background is assumed, nor is any special familiarity with the field of health care required.


GOV 391. Classical Political Thought. 3 Hours.

A study of the political philosophy of the ancients through close reading and discussion of selected texts of the major authors.


GOV 392. Modern Political Thought. 3 Hours.

A study of the political philosophy of the moderns through close reading and discussion of selected texts of the major authors beginning with Machiavelli.


GOV 411. Constitutional Law of the United States. 3 Hours.

An overview of the major areas of American constitutional law emphasizing the reading and analysis of cases and the natural and common law background of the Constitution.


GOV 434. Statesmanship of Lincoln. 3 Hours.

A study of Abraham Lincoln?s entire political career with the aim of coming to an informed critical judgment about his political prudence and moderation in preserving and improving American constitutional democracy.


GOV 435. Contemporary Political Thought. 3 Hours.

A study of the most important political questions and movements of thought shaping the post-modern age through the reading of texts chosen by the instructor.


GOV 436. Statesmanship of Winston Churchill. 3 Hours.

A study of statesmanship through the career of Winston S. Churchill.


GOV 437. Politics and Literature. 3 Hours.

The teachings of the greatest poets about politics.


GOV 440. American Political Thought. 3 Hours.

An examination of the origin and development of major American political ideas as revealed in political essays, letters, and novels.


GOV 450. Senior Directed Study. 1 to 3 Hours.

Intensive guided study and research on selected topics in any field of political science. The instructor, in consultation with the student, will establish the subject for study and the requirements. Enrollment normally is limited to seniors majoring in Government who are of high academic standing.


GOV 470. Independent Study in Government. 1 to 3 Hours.

Independent study of selected topics in government at an advanced level. Specific topics vary from semester to semester.


GOV 480. Advanced Topics in American Government. 1 to 4 Hours.

Selected topics in the functions, policies, organization, and theory of American government. Subject matter varies.


GOV 495. Advanced Topics in Political Theory. 1 to 4 Hours.

Selected topics in political theory. Subject matter varies.


GOV 500. Honors Course. 3 Hours.

At the discretion of the faculty, students may undertake a six-hour independent course of study in the senior year in order to broaden their educational experience within their major area of study. Students must meet specific GPA standards and arrange a faculty sponsor. The honors course criteria are outlined in the Academic Honors portion of the catalog.


International Affairs (INTL) 

INTL 203. Foundations of World Politics. 3 Hours.

A historical, philosophical, and topical foundation in international relations and comparative politics, and an introduction to essential research skills.


INTL 260. Comparing States & Societies. 3 Hours.

This course will examine major questions in comparative politics, such as why have some countries been much more successful at achieving economic development than others? The course emphasizes the political systems and unique histories and economic situations of Iran, China, India, Nigeria, and Russia.


INTL 280. Selected Topics in International Affairs. 1 to 4 Hours.

Selected topics in international affairs at the introductory or intermediate level.


INTL 360. European Politics. 3 Hours.

A study of the politics of selected European states in historical perspective. Other topics in European politics may also be covered.


INTL 361. Middle East Politics. 3 Hours.

A study of the contemporary politics of the Middle East, including domestic politics, foreign relations, the role of oil, the origins and impact of terrorism, and the dramatic encounter of cultures in the region. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Cultures and Peoples requirements for graduation.


INTL 362. China: Politics, Economy and Foreign Relations. 3 Hours.

A survey of the rise of modern China as a major power, with particular emphasis on its politics, economy, and foreign relations. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Cultures and Peoples requirement for graduation.


INTL 363. African Politics. 3 Hours.

Explores the internal and international politics of sub-Saharan Africa within its rich cultural, economic, humanitarian, and historical contexts, and also addresses special issues such as failed states, humanitarian intervention, HIV/AIDS and other health issues, and demographic trends specific to Africa. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Cultures and Peoples requirement for graduation.


INTL 364. Russia & Its Neighbors. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the politics, economics, and foreign policy of Russia and other postcommunist states in Central Asia and Europe. The class will investigate the relationship between Russia and its neighbors, the common experience of communism and postcommunism, and questions about democracy and authoritarianism. Along with studying Russia in detail, we will also examine cases of successful political and economic transition, cases of failed political transitions, and inconclusive cases.


INTL 381. The Bomb: Nuclear Weapons Past, Present and Future. 3 Hours.

This course will provide a survey of the historical, development, deployment, spread and control of nuclear weapons worldwide, and will examine the evolving contemporary debate on their significance, potential uses, and the means for restraining their further proliferation.


INTL 382. Global Issues. 3 Hours.

A study of major global issues, such as Third World poverty, the population explosion, hunger in the poor countries and food consumption in the rich countries, energy use and supplies, environmental deterioration, the appropriate and inappropriate uses of technology, and alternative futures.


INTL 383. Revolutions & Regime Change. 3 Hours.

This class will examine the causes and effects of revolutions and regime transitions. In order to understand the complexities and nuances of revolutions and transitions, we will study cases from the 2011 Arab Spring and other regions, including East Europe, Asia, and Latin America. The multi-region approach allows for cross-cultural testing of the theories of regime change and a more nuanced investigation of the causes and consequences of major political, economic, and social change. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Cultures and Peoples requirement for graduation.


INTL 420. American Foreign Policy. 3 Hours.

A study of the forces and factors involved in the formulation and implementation of contemporary United States policy.


INTL 421. International Conflict. 3 Hours.

A study of war and the use of force in international affairs with emphasis on the causes of international conflict.


INTL 422. Empire. 3 Hours.

A survey of the history, politics, and interaction of various modern empires in world politics. In addition, an inquiry into the debate about America as an empire.


INTL 423. NGOs in World Politics. 3 Hours.

An exploration of the changing roles and influence of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in world politics, with case studies including human rights, hunger relief, environmentalism, population control, women's rights, democratization, peacemaking, and inter-religious dialogue.


INTL 424. Politics of the United Nations. 3 Hours.

A study of the evolution of the United Nations, its activities and impact, its use and misuse by member states and other actors, how both the world and the United States need the UN, and the potential for UN adaptation to change.


INTL 425. America & the Global Economy. 3 Hours.

This course provides a survey of the politics of the global economy with emphasis on historical developments, concepts, theoretical perspectives, institutions, and contemporary topics. Substantial emphasis is placed on America's role in the global economy, though other economic powers, including the European Union, China, Japan, and India are also examined.


INTL 450. Senior Directed Study. 1 to 3 Hours.

Intensive guided study and research on selected topics in any field of international affairs. The instructor, in consultation with the student, will establish the subject for study and the requirements. Enrollment normally is limited to seniors majoring in Government or International Affairs who are of high academic standing.


INTL 470. Independent Study in International Affairs. 1 to 3 Hours.

Independent study of selected topics in international affairs at an advanced level. Specific topics vary from semester to semester.


INTL 490. Advanced Topics in International Affairs and Comparative Government. 1 to 4 Hours.

Selected topics in international and comparative politics. Subject matter varies.


INTL 500. Honors Course. 3 Hours.

At the discretion of the faculty, students may undertake a six-hour independent course of study in the senior year in order to broaden their educational experience within their major area of study. Students must meet specific GPA standards and arrange a faculty sponsor. The honors course criteria are outlined in the Academic Honors portion of the catalog.