Psychology (PSY)

PSY 103. Psychology: Science in Context. 3 Hours.

Students will explore the features that make science an important way of understanding the natural world. This exploration will focus on science-based topics and issues important in our contemporary world.


PSY 104. Psychology: Concepts & Methods (with lab). 4 Hours.

A study of topics selected to introduce students to basic concepts in psychology and to the scientific method.


PSY 110. Introductory Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with a broad knowledge base of major concepts, theories, and research methods in the field of psychology. A scientific approach will be taken to examine topics to allow students to critically think about and apply psychological principles to their lives. Requires junior or senior standing to enroll and will not apply to the general education science requirement. Students may not earn credit for both PSY 110 and PSY 150.


PSY 150. Introduction to Psychological Science (with lab). 4 Hours.

Identical to PSY 110 with a lab component. This course will provide students with a broad knowledge base of the major concepts, theories, and research methods in the field of psychology. Emphasis will be placed on the use of critical thinking skills, and how students can apply psychological principles to their lives.The laboratory section will provide the opportunity to collect, analyze, and interpret data. Student will also understand and develop scientific writing and oral communication skills through revised APA style report and a presentation. Students may not earn credit for both PSY 110 and PSY 150.


PSY 160. Introduction to Statistics in Psychology. 3 Hours.

Students will learn basic concepts in descriptive and inferential statistics, emphasizing applications to psychology. The course will also focus on the use of appropriate statistical methods when conducting research, assessing the validity of statistical results in scientific work, and writing scientific results using APA guidelines. Students will learn the necessary fundamental knowledge needed to complete further psychology laboratory courses.

Prerequisite: PSY 110 with a minimum grade of D or PSY 150 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 161. Research Methods in Psychology. 3 Hours.

Course is designed to acquaint students with scientific methods used in psychology. Students will acquire skills necessary to design reliable and valid experiments, interpret data, and write scientific reports using APA guidelines. The course covers fundamental methodological, statistical, and writing skills necessary for further laboratory courses.

Prerequisite: PSY 160 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 200. Experimental Methods (with lab). 4 Hours.

A survey of the research methods used to obtain scientific knowledge in psychology, with an emphasis on experimental design and the interpretation of research results.Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 140.

Prerequisite: MATH 140 with a minimum grade of D and (PSY 110 with a minimum grade of D or PSY 150 with a minimum grade of D).


PSY 220. Abnormal Psychology. 3 Hours.

The study of the causes of inappropriate behaviors and cognitions (including mental illness) and techniques for redirecting such behaviors and cognitions.


PSY 230. Biological Psychology (with lab). 4 Hours.

An introduction to the concepts and experimental techniques of biological psychology. This course covers the scope of genetic, neural, and hormonal processes that underlie behavior.

Prerequisite: PSY 161 with a minimum grade of D or PSY 200 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 240. Child & Adolescent Development. 3 Hours.

A survey of child and adolescent development. Major theories about and influences on cognitive, emotional, physical, and moral development are explored.


PSY 250. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

An exploration of the basic questions addressed by social psychology (e.g., how people influence each other) and the classic experiments conducted to test the theories.


PSY 255. Introduction to Research. 1 to 3 Hours.

Research experience is an integral skill required in the field of psychology. This course provides an opportunity for students to become engaged in research projects in the Department of Psychology early in their undergraduate education.


PSY 256. Introduction to Research II. 1 to 3 Hours.

Research experience is an integral skill required in the field of psychology. This course provides an opportunity for students to become engaged in research projects in the Department of Psychology early in their undergraduate education.


PSY 260. Personality. 3 Hours.

The development and identification of personality from an experimental/empirical standpoint.


PSY 270. Health Psychology. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the rapidly developing field of health psychology. Our thoughts, feelings, motives, and behaviors influence our physical health, and they are involved in the causes and maintenance of various potentially fatal diseases. This course explores how psychology contributes to an understanding of the genesis, treatment, maintenance, and prevention of a number of medical conditions, as well as implications for health care practice and policy.


PSY 280. Selected Topics in Psychology. 0 to 4 Hours.

Selected topics in psychology at the introductory or intermediate level.


PSY 300. Learning & Adaptive Behavior (with lab). 4 Hours.

A survey of the general principles of learning and adaptive behavior in humans and lower animals. The course emphasizes the evolution of these mechanisms, their current adaptive function, and current models of learning processes.

Prerequisite: PSY 230 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 310. Cognitive Science (with lab). 4 Hours.

A survey of the experimental analysis of how the mind works, including the topics of perception, attention, human memory, language, imagery, problem solving and decision making.

Prerequisite: PSY 230 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 315. Sensation & Perception (with lab). 4 Hours.

A study of how the mind processes incoming sensory neural signals in order to create our perception of the world, including topics of transduction, neural coding, and the influence of cognitive processes such as attention, memory and experience.

Prerequisite: PSY 230 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 325. Abnormal Child Psychology. 3 Hours.

A seminar course designed to synthesize the various problematic behaviors, cognitions, and emotion in children. Students will integrate the major issues in the assessment, classification, and treatment of childhood disorders as well as evaluate the current scientific literature related to these disorders. An emphasis will be placed on class participation, writing assignments, and reading original journal articles.

Prerequisite: (PSY 160 with a minimum grade of C or PSY 200 with a minimum grade of C) and PSY 220 with a minimum grade of C and PSY 240 with a minimum grade of C.


PSY 330. Behavioral Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

An advanced study of the relationship between the human nervous system and behavior. Both case studies and primary research will be used as a model to explore a wide spectrum of behaviors and neural systems not including neurological disorders. The optional lab provides an opportunity to gain expertise in the quantification and analysis of animal behavior as well as advanced electrophysiological techniques such as EEG, EOG, integrated whole nerve recordings, and single neuron recordings in both human and animal models. Students with the appropriate academic background may be exempted from the prerequisite by the instructor.

Prerequisite: PSY 230 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 333. Clinical Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

An advanced study of the relationship between the human nervous system and behavior using neurological disorders as the model. Both case studies and primary research will be used to explore a wide spectrum of neurological disorders. Students with the appropriate academic background may be exempted from the prerequisite by the course instructor.

Prerequisite: PSY 230 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 335. Affective Neuroscience. 3 Hours.

Affective neuroscience refers to the study of the brain's role in processing emotions, moods and attitudes. In addition to providing an overview of the methods used in affective neuroscience, this course will explore topics including, how emotions are used to make decisions, how emotional responses can be regulated, and how emotional experiences are perceived, attended to and remembered. This course will also examine how these processes break down in affective disorders such as depression, anxiety disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Prerequisite: PSY 230 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 337. Human Memory. 3 Hours.

A seminar course designed to examine specific research questions, methods, findings and conclusions about human memory. Students will read, analyze and discuss current and classic original journal articles. Emphasis will be placed on improving skills of critical thinking, article reading, APA style writing, and public speaking in the context of memory research.

Prerequisite: PSY 230 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 340. Adult Development and Aging. 3 Hours.

A study of development (cognitive, emotional, and social, through adulthood and aging) and of relevant issues such as Alzheimer's disease and death.

Prerequisite: PSY 200 with a minimum grade of D and PSY 240 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 351. Psychopharmacology. 3 Hours.

A study of the actions of psychoactive drugs on the nervous system and behavior. Some prior acquaintance with basic neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and behavioral techniques is suggested.

Prerequisite: PSY 230 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 355. Industrial Psychology. 3 Hours.

A general course designed to acquaint students with the uses of psychology in industrial applications. Emphasis on interviewing, motivating, selling, brainstorming, and related aspects of social psychological processes in industrial settings. Of special interest to students of business, law, and the ministry.

Prerequisite: PSY 151 with a minimum grade of D or PSY 200 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 360. Applied Statistics for Psychology. 3 Hours.

A course in statistics and other quantitative methods applied to psychology.

Prerequisite: MATH 140 with a minimum grade of D and (PSY 151 with a minimum grade of D or PSY 200 with a minimum grade of D).


PSY 365. Psychology & the Law. 3 Hours.

A seminar course designed to examine empirical research and procedural/investigative issues in the interface of psychology and law. This course will explore standard practices in the criminal justice system and psychological research devoted to investigating and improving those practices.

Prerequisite: PSY 110 with a minimum grade of D or PSY 150 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 420. Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours.

A course teaching techniques of interviewing clients to diagnose problems, types of therapy and their appropriateness for the various types of problems, the distinction between ineffective and effective therapeutic techniques, and the measurement of the effectiveness of an intervention. This course exposes students to the research, teaching, and clinical service roles performed by clinical psychologists.

Prerequisite: PSY 200 with a minimum grade of D and PSY 220 with a minimum grade of D and (PSY 250 with a minimum grade of D or PSY 260 with a minimum grade of D or PSY 270 with a minimum grade of D).


PSY 430. Psychological Assessment. 3 Hours.

A study of the function, construction, and application of standardized tests as part of a broader approach to the assessment of the individual. Special emphasis on intelligence testing.

Prerequisite: (PSY 151 with a minimum grade of D or PSY 200 with a minimum grade of D) and PSY 220 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 448. Internship. 3 Hours.

A course in which students become involved in the practical application of psychological training. Students work a minimum of ten hours a week in a community program under supervision at such agencies as the Spartanburg Mental Health Center, Broughton State Hospital, Charles Lea Center, or Spartanburg Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission. Open only to students majoring in Psychology.


PSY 450. Comparative Cognition. 3 Hours.

A seminar designed to examine specific research questions, methods, findings, and conclusions about comparative cognition. Students will learn about specific topics within animal cognition by reading, analyzing, and discussing current and classic original journal articles. The course emphasizes improving skills of critical thinking, article reading, writing in APA style, and public speaking in the context of research in comparative cognition. Intructor permission required.

Prerequisite: PSY 300 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 451. Senior Thesis I. 4 Hours.

A research-oriented seminar focusing on the mechanisms of behavior, cognition, perception, or social interaction. Students conduct a major experiment with human or animal subjects and present their findings in a written report meeting American Psychological Association journal form requirements. A comprehensive written review of the professional literature in the student's area of research is also required. Students must complete either 451 or 452, but they may complete both courses.

Prerequisite: PSY 300 with a minimum grade of D or PSY 310 with a minimum grade of D or PSY 315 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 452. Senior Thesis II. 4 Hours.

A research-oriented seminar focusing on the mechanisms of behavior, cognition, perception, or social interaction. Students conduct a major experiment with human or animal subjects and present their findings in a written report meeting American Psychological Association journal form requirements. A comprehensive written review of the professional literature in the student's area of research is also required. Students must complete either 451 or 452, but they may complete both courses.

Prerequisite: PSY 300 with a minimum grade of D or PSY 310 with a minimum grade of D or PSY 315 with a minimum grade of D.


PSY 460. Advanced Research. 0 to 4 Hours.

This course is designed to permit students to learn independent research techniques through actually planning and conducting an experiment. A final paper meeting American Psychological Association journal form requirements completes the experiment. Open only to students majoring in Psychology.


PSY 480. Advanced Topics in Psychology. 1 to 4 Hours.

An intensive examination of an advanced area of psychology. Specific content is designed to meet the needs and interests of students. Open only to students majoring in psychology.


PSY 500. Honors Course. 3 Hours.

At the discretion of the faculty, students may undertake a six-hour independent course of study in the senior year in order to broaden their educational experience within their major area of study. Students must meet specific GPA standards and arrange a faculty sponsor. The honors course criteria are outlined in the Academic Honors portion of the catalog.